music clip of the day

jazz/blues/rock/classical/gospel/more

Tag: Wilson Pickett

Monday, 12/10/12

basement jukebox

The Falcons (feat. Wilson Pickett, lead vocals; Robert Ward, guitar)
“I Found A Love” (1962)

***

Albert Washington (feat. Lonnie Mack, guitar)
“Hold Me Baby” (1969)

**********

lagniappe

reading table

[T]he greatest reading pleasure has an element of self-annihilation. To be so engrossed that you barely know you exist. I last felt that in relation to a poem while in the sitting room of Elizabeth Bishop’s old home in rural Brazil. I stood in a corner, apart from the general conversation, and read “Under the Window: Ouro Preto.” The street outside was once an obscure thoroughfare for donkeys and peasants. Bishop reports overheard lines as people pass by her window, including the beautifully noted “When my mother combs my hair it hurts.” That same street now is filled with thunderous traffic — it fairly shakes the house. When I finished the poem I found that my friends and our hosts had left the room. What is it precisely, that feeling of “returning” from a poem? Something is lighter, softer, larger — then it fades, but never completely.

—Ian McEwan, New York Times Sunday Book Review, 12/9/12

Saturday, 9/1/12

basement jukebox

The Falcons (feat. Wilson Pickett [vocals], Robert Ward [guitar])
“Take This Love I’ve Got” (1963)

***

The Ohio Untouchables (feat. Robert Ward [vocals/guitar])
“I’m Tired” (1962)

**********

lagniappe

found words

Singer, 43, Snapped In Tiny Bikini

—AOL Headline, 8/31/12

***

This active fluidity and tidal composite of duration is the condition of the aesthetic.

—George Steiner, The Poetry of Thought: From Hellenism To Celan (2011)

Friday, April 30, 2010

Me and a million other dudes said ‘later’ to picking cotton.—Wilson Pickett (in Gerri Hershey, Nowhere to Run: The Story of Soul Music [1994])

Wilson Pickett, live, Germany, 1968

“Stagger Lee”

*****

“Funky Broadway”

Want more? Here.

**********

lagniappe

listening room

The UPS guy left a tiny box yesterday—the new albums by Roky Erickson and Gil Scott-Heron. Who’s next? Sly Stone?

*****

mail

The Bobby Dylan clip was very nice and linked to Manfred Mann—sweet. Thanks.

***

Thanks, Richard! Emails like yours are the main reason I have some energy every week to sit down and grind through another show. Many thanks.

—Kevin [Nutt, host of Sinner’s Crossroads on WFMU-FM, responding to an email notifying him of this mention]

Friday, 2/12/10

Sometimes you’re not in the mood for subtlety.

Or complexity.

Or anything else that’s got more than one syllable.

You want sweat.

Funk.

That clenched scream: “Uhowwwww!”

***

Wilson Pickett, live, Germany, 1968

“Everybody Needs Someone To Love”

*****

“I’m In Love”

*****

“Ninety-Nine And A Half (Won’t Do)”

*****

“Mustang Sally”

**********

lagniappe

“We didn’t make enough money to press our suits,” Pickett reminisced when asked about the Violinaires, the gospel group he formed shortly after moving to Detroit from his native Alabama. “We would sing three programs a Sunday at different churches. We’d sing our hearts out, and so we done sweated up that suit three times — from the socks all the way up.

“The sisters would get up and they’d put a penny or a dime on the table and say ‘Ya’ll boys sho’ can sing.’ And we’d come in the back, and they got all the chicken baskets and pies and stuff to eat, and even occasionally one of the sisters would take you home.”

The young Pickett soon caught the eye not only of a sister or two, but also of the Falcons, a local R&B group with whom he later wrote and sang his first hit song, “I Found a Love,” in 1962.

“I was scared because these people says that if you leave God and go to the devil, you’re going to go to hell. You see, I wanted to sing gospel, but I wanted to make some money, too. So I said, ‘No I’ll never leave, I’ll never leave God.’ Until that evening that one of the Falcons came by and I was sitting on the back porch and I went down and tried it out. And from then on I told God, I looked up and I said, ‘I’m on my way this way — would You care to go with me? I’d really appreciate Your being with me. It’d make me feel better.’—Ken Emerson, “Wilson Pickett: Soul Man On Ice”

%d bloggers like this: