music clip of the day

jazz/blues/rock/classical/gospel/more

Category: mail

Sunday, February 17th

Voices, hands.

Guitar, bass, drums.

And soul.

Sensational Friendly Brothers, Canton, Mississippi (St. James Missionary Baptist Church), 1978

“Where Shall I Be (When the First Trumpet Sounds)”



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“Heaven Is My Goal”


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lagniappe

mail

Thanks, Richard—great clips too.

—George Saunders, featured here the other day

Saturday, 12/15/12

A reader writes:

Dear Richard:

I think you should check out the YouTube link below. From Dore Stein who is the host of a great radio show on Sat. nights on the SF United School District’s radio station, KALW.

Melos: Mediterranean Songs (filmed in Tunisia and Germany, 2011)*

*****

taking a break

I’m taking some time off—back in a while.

*****

*With Dorsaf Hamdani & Ensemble (Tunisia), En Chordais (Greece), Juan Carmona & Ensemble (Spain), Keyvan Chemirani (France/Iran), et al.

Friday, 7/13/12

only rock ’n’ roll

A reader writes:

An old friend sent me this Youtube clip of a concert we attended back in high school. At the time I had never heard of Fleetwood Mac or Peter Green.  They were the opening act and, not surprisingly, I have now forgotten who we went to see.

Fleetwood Mac, “Black Magic Woman,” live, Boston (Boston Tea Party), 1970

Monday, 11/7/11

Chrome, “Meet You In The Subway” (1979, record; 1984, video)

So much of our musical experience resists explanation. Take this track, for instance. As soon as it’s over, I want to hear it again. Why? No idea.

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lagniappe

mail: two posts, two messages, same correspondent

Last Monday (Koko Taylor/Louis Jordan):

Great boost!

Yesterday (Brother Anthony Wynn/Sensimo):

what the fuck!?!

Wednesday, 8/3/11

The other night, as we headed home after having dinner at a Mexican restaurant I first went to when I was about his age (Nuevo Leon, 1515 W. 18th St., Chicago), my (23-year-old son) Alex slid these guys into the dashboard CD player.

TV on the Radio, Nine Types of Light (2011)

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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lagniappe

mail

What an unexpected delight it was to receive, in yesterday’s mail, a note from New Orleans trumpeter Lionel Ferbos, the world’s oldest performing jazz musician (previously mentioned here and here), thanking me for the card I sent him for his 100th birthday.

Friday, 7/15/11

How’d you get along without this?

James Brown, Japan, 1992

Vodpod videos no longer available.

More? Here. And here. And here.

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lagniappe

mail

This just in from a longtime reader/listener:

Every day I look forward to turning on my computer to see what the clip of the day is. I love what you are doing. Keep it up.

***

And several musicians have checked in, responding to messages letting them know they were being featured here.

Hello Richard

How kind of you to send me the info.

Peace always,

Bernard Purdie

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That’s great, thank you!!

Peace,
And Justice!

Ray Anderson

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Thanks Richard

“may your groove be phat”

              george porter, jr.

Tuesday, 7/12/11

John Luther Adams, Inuksuit (excerpt)
New York (Park Avenue Armory), 2/20/11

Vodpod videos no longer available.

More? Here.

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lagniappe

Scored for a flexible ensemble of between nine and ninety-nine percussionists, “Inuksuit” is intended for outdoor performance, and it had its première on a mountainside in Banff, Canada, in 2009. Adams at first resisted the idea of taking the piece indoors, because the interaction with nature was integral to his conception. After inspecting the Armory, though, he grasped its possibilities; the space is more a man-made canyon than a concert hall. He settled on a corps of seventy-six musicians, including five piccolo players. Arrays of drums, gongs, cymbals, bells, and numerous smaller instruments were set up on the main floor of the Drill Hall; atop catwalks on all sides; and in the hallways that connect to smaller rooms at the front of the building. In any rendition of “Inuksuit,” the performers are given four or five pages of music—the notation imitates the shapes of the Inuit markers—which they execute at their own pace. Musicians with portable instruments are instructed to move about freely. Prearranged signals prompt a move from one page to the next. The result is a composition that on the microcosmic level seems spontaneous, even chaotic, but that gathers itself into a grand, almost symphonic structure.

At 4 P.M. on a Sunday, thirteen hundred people assembled in the Drill Hall to hear the piece, variously standing, sitting, or lying on the floor. First came an awakening murmur: one group of performers exhaled through horns and cones; others rubbed stones together and made whistling sounds by whirling tubes. Then one member of the ensemble—Schick, perched above the entrance to the Drill Hall—delivered a call on a conch shell. With that commanding, shofar-like tone, the sound started to swell: tom-toms and bass drums thudded, cymbals and tam-tams crashed, sirens wailed, bells clanged. It was an engulfing, complexly layered noise, one that seemed almost to force the listeners into motion, and the crowd fanned out through the arena.

***

It is tricky to write about an event such as this. Because both ensemble and audience were in motion, no two perceptions of the performance were the same, and no definitive record of it can exist. Furthermore, anyone who ventures to declare in a public forum that “Inuksuit” was one of the most rapturous experiences of his listening life—that is how I felt, and I wasn’t the only one—might be suspected of harboring hippie-dippie tendencies. The work is not explicitly political, nor is it the formal expression of an individual sensibility, although John Luther Adams certainly deserved the ecstatic and prolonged ovation that greeted him when he acknowledged the crowd from the center of the Drill Hall. In the end, several young couples seemed to deliver the most incisive commentary when, amid the obliterating tidal wave of sound, they began making out.

—Alex Ross, New Yorker, 3/14/11

*****

Happy Birthday, Suzanne!

As I mentioned on this date last year, the first time my wife Suzanne and I went out together (September 1974, Chicago’s Jazz Showcase), we saw the man who put the sui in sui generis.

Sun Ra, Space Is the Place (1974), excerpt

Vodpod videos no longer available.

More? Here. And here.

*****

speaking of birthdays

How often do you get to say “Happy 100th Birthday”?

Well, here’s your chance.

As I learned the other day from WKCR-FM’s Phil Schaap, who’s been encouraging folks to send this guy a birthday card (I mailed mine yesterday), the oldest performing jazz musician, trumpeter Lionel Ferbos, who plays at New Orleans’ Palm Court Jazz Cafe, turns 100 on July 17th. Birthday greetings can be mailed (remember mail?) to 5543 Press Dr., New Orleans, LA 70126.

Monday, 6/20/11

Here’s another take on the blues.

Ben Webster Quartet (BW, tenor saxophone; Stan Tracey, piano; Rick Laird, bass; Jackie Dougan, drums), “Poutin’,” live

Vodpod videos no longer available.

More? Here. And here. And here.

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lagniappe

Sonny Rollins, Joe Lovano, et al., talk about Ben Webster

Vodpod videos no longer available.

*****

mail

You are sending out some great stuff at all times. . . . It’s always interesting, and the one you sent out today, Onmutu Mechanicks, was especially cool, since I hadn’t ever crossed their path.

Sunday, 6/5/11

Some folks sing when they speak.

Bishop Robert Manley, Jr., Bethesda Temple Church of the Living God, Frankfort, Kentucky, 2008

Part 1

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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Part 2

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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lagniappe

musical thoughts

I think there are certain aspects of music which do not have any equivalent in speech, in particular the pulse of music, the steady rhythm, and its synchronization with movement.

Oliver Sacks, M.D.

With all due respect to Dr. Sacks (whom I admire greatly), I think maybe he should get out more often—to, for instance, churches in Harlem.

*****

listening room: what’s playing

Professor Longhair, Crawfish Fiesta (Alligator); House Party New Orleans Style (Rounder); No Buts, No Maybes: The 1949-1957 Recordings (Hoodoo Records)

Arthur Russell, Calling Out Of Context (Audika)

Theo Parrish, Sound Sculptures Volume 1 (Sound Signature)

Eddie Jefferson at Ali’s Alley with Rashied Ali Quintet (Blue Music Group)

• Wadada Leo Smith’s Golden Quartet, Tabligh (Cuneiform)

• Henry Grimes & Rashied Ali, Going To The Ritual (Porter Records)

Paul Motian, Lost In A Dream (ECM) (with Chris Potter, Jason Moran); Rarum (ECM); Garden of Eden (ECM); Time and Time Again (ECM) (with Joe Lovano, Bill Frisell)

Jason Moran, Ten (Blue Note)

• Various Artists, Gospel Music (Hyena Records)

The Five Blind Boys of Mississippi: 1947-1954 (Acrobat)

Brother Claude Ely, Ain’t No Grave (Dust-to-Digital)

The Skatalites, Ball of Fire (Island)

Tinariwen: Imidiwan: Companions (World Village)

Ali Akbar Khan, Peerless (Navras)

Bach: Cello Suites, Nos. 1-3, Jean-Guinen Queyras (Harmonia Mundi)

Dmitri Shostakovich: String Quartet No. 15, Borodin Quartet (BMG Classics/Melodiya)

Music of Stefan Wolpe: Volume Six, David Holzman (Bridge Records)

Gyorgy Ligeti: String Quartets and Duets, Arditti String Quartet (Sony)

Morton Feldman: For Bunita Marcus, Stephane Ginsburgh (Sub Rosa); John TilburyMorton Feldman, All Piano (London HALL)

WKCR-FM (broadcasting from Columbia University)
Bird Flight (Phil Schaap, jazz [Charlie Parker])
Out to Lunch (Various, jazz)
Afternoon New Music (Various, classical and hard-to-peg)
Eastern Standard Time (Carter Van Pelt, Jamaican music)

WFMU-FM
Mudd Up! (DJ/Rupture, “new bass and beats”)
Sinner’s Crossroads
(Kevin Nutt, gospel)
—Give The Drummer Some
(Doug Schulkind, sui generis)
—Reggae Schoolhouse
(Jeff Sarge)
Transpacific Sound Paradise (Rob Weisberg, “popular and unpopular music from around the world”)
Daniel Blumin (sui generis)
—Primavera Sound Festival, Barcelona (live sets)

*****

mail

Richard:

Thanks and despite its brevity it is quite touching.

David [Holzman, in response to an email letting him know that he was featured here yesterday]

Friday, 4/29/11

When you’re young you can’t imagine that the things that make your life sing won’t always be there. Then you get older. And they aren’t.

Hound Dog Taylor & The Houserockers (Brewer Phillips, guitar; Ted Harvey, drums), “Sadie,” live, Ann Arbor Blues Festival, 1973

More? Here.

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langiappe

mail

This arrived yesterday, in response to an email letting her know that she was featured here (with Hazel Dickens):

Thanks for letting me know about this.  We said goodbye to Hazel yesterday and singing was never more difficult.  She was my musical guide and my beloved friend.  Smart, funny, complicated, always real.   She’ll live in my music, and my life, forever.  “Fly away, Little Pretty Bird.”

Ginny

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Hazel Dickens, “Pretty Bird,” 1967

Vodpod videos no longer available.
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