music clip of the day

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Category: Haiti

Monday, June 20th

what’s new

Afro-Haitian Experimental Orchestra (Tony Allen, drums, et al.)
“Bade Zile,” 2016


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lagniappe

reading table

We don’t want him thinking too much.

Cubs pitcher John Lackey on rookie catcher Wilson Contreras’s first start tonight, following last night’s home run in his first big-league plate appearance—on the first pitch

Friday, September 5th

Today, MCOTD‘s fifth anniversary, we revisit a few early favorites.

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September 5, 2009

One left Cuba after the revolution, the other stayed. Here they play together: pianists—father and son—Bebo (1918-2013) and Chucho (1941-) Valdes.

 

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September 11, 2009

If spirit could be sold, New Orleans would be rich.

Rebirth Brass Band, live, New Orleans, 2009


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September 23, 2009

May, 2012

Nobel-Prize-winning economist devises a way to turn faces—images of them, that is—into marketable commodities: the more expressive the face, the greater the value.

March, 2013

Haiti is named one of the world’s wealthiest countries.

Arcade Fire, “Haiti”


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Without music where would we be?

Monday, 5/21/12

sounds of Haiti

Rara music, live, Leogane

Saturday, 11/5/11

sounds of Haiti

Rara festival, Kabic (Haiti), Easter, 2005

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lagniappe


Rara music is a Lenten processional music with strong ties to the Vodou religious tradition. It has been commonly confused with Haitian Carnival since both celebrations involve large groups of dancing revelers in the streets. Rara is performed between Ash Wednesday (the day after Carnival ends) until Easter Sunday (or Easter Monday in some parts of Haiti.) Rara bands roam the streets performing religious ceremonies as part of their ritual obligations to the “lwa” or spirits of Haitian Voodoo. Guédé, a spirit associated with death and sexuality, is an important spiritual presence in Rara celebrations and often possesses an ougan (male Voodoo priest) or mambo (female Voodoo priest) before the band begins its procession in order to bless the participants and wish them safe travels for their nightly sojourns.

Wikipedia

Thursday, 5/19/11

scenes from New Orleans
(an occasional series)

DJA-Rara, live, New Orleans (Jazz Fest), 5/1/11

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lagniappe

“It’s a fascinating time for Haitian music,” said Ned Sublette, author of “The World that Made New Orleans.” “Haitians voted for the music ticket [electing kompa singer Michel Martelly president]. You cannot deny the importance of communication through music in Haiti. And this is something New Orleanians know well.”

—Katy Reckdahl, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans), 4/29/11

Wednesday, 5/11/11

scenes from New Orleans
an occasional series

Some music you listen to. Some you inhabit.

Rara Haiti, live, New Orleans (Jazz Fest), 5/11

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Monday, 11/16/09

Saturday morning, driving down to Champaign-Urbana to visit my younger son Luke (Dads’ Weekend at the U of I), when the radio signal on Scott Simon’s NPR show started to fade (interviews this week with Wes Anderson and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar), I took out this CD and slid it into the dashboard player—something Luke gave me, a couple years ago, for Christmas.

Wyclef Jean, Carnival II: Memoirs of an Immigrant (2007)

“Sweetest Girl (Dollar Bill)” (with Akon and Lil Wayne)

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“Any Other Day” (with Norah Jones)

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“Fast Car” (with Paul Simon)

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lagniappe

A native of Haiti, WJ established a foundation to provide aid to the people of that country, which can be found here.

Haiti is my native country, one I know as the first black nation to gain independence in 1804. Most other people seem to know Haiti only by the statistics about how bad things are there. The majority of its 8 million residents live on less than $1 per day. Unemployment is close to 80 percent, and more than half the population is under 21 years old. Haiti is the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere.

I have been spending a lot of time talking with people in my native country to try and understand what is behind these statistics and the past escalation of violence, all of which brings tears to my eyes. I have had conversations with gang leaders, met with the police officers and sat down with the leaders of the militias and the army. I have talked with Haitians from all walks of life, all colors of skin, all backgrounds and beliefs. From all these people I hear only one thing in my head and feel only one thing in my heart–that there is only one Haiti. Every Haitian loves their country like a mother loves her child.

I see old women with large bags of rice on their heads and men on street corners selling sugarcane and mangos, all just trying to survive with a strong sense of pride. Walking past a church in my village, I hear the congregation singing an appeal to God to hear their cries and grant deliverance to Haiti. Through experiences like this, I sense where my mother and my father got their strength. Now the whole country needs to reach deep into the spirit and strength that is part of our heritage.

The objective of [my foundation] Yéle Haiti is to restore pride and a reason to hope, and for the whole country to regain the deep spirit and force that is part of our heritage.—Wyclef Jean

Wednesday, 9/23/09

May, 2012

Nobel-Prize-winning economist devises a way to turn faces—images of them, that is—into marketable commodities: the more expressive the face, the greater the value.

March, 2013

Haiti is named one of the world’s wealthiest countries.

Arcade Fire, “Haiti”

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