music clip of the day

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Category: soul

Saturday, October 12th

basement jukebox

Willie Mitchell, record producer, March 1, 1928–January 5, 2010  

O. V. Wright (1939-1980), “A Nickel and a Nail,” 1971

 

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Syl Johnson (1936-), “Take Me to the River,” 1975

 

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Otis Clay (1942-2016), “Trying to Live My Life Without You,” 1972

 

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Ann Peebles (1947-), “I Can’t Stand the Rain,” 1973

 

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Al Green (1946-), “Let’s Stay Together,” 1971

 

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lagniappe

random sights

other day, Kankakee, Ill.

Saturday, September 7th

basement jukebox

The Escorts, “Ooh Baby Baby” (S. Robinson, P. Moore), 1973

 

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lagniappe

reading table

The Map
by Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979)

Land lies in water; it is shadowed green.
Shadows, or are they shallows, at its edges
showing the line of long sea-weeded ledges
where weeds hang to the simple blue from green.
Or does the land lean down to lift the sea from under,
drawing it unperturbed around itself?
Along the fine tan sandy shelf
is the land tugging at the sea from under?

The shadow of Newfoundland lies flat and still.
Labrador’s yellow, where the moony Eskimo
has oiled it. We can stroke these lovely bays,
under a glass as if they were expected to blossom,
or as if to provide a clean cage for invisible fish.
The names of seashore towns run out to sea,
the names of cities cross the neighboring mountains
—the printer here experiencing the same excitement
as when emotion too far exceeds its cause.
These peninsulas take the water between thumb and finger
like women feeling for the smoothness of yard-goods.

Mapped waters are more quiet than the land is,
lending the land their waves’ own conformation:
and Norway’s hare runs south in agitation,
profiles investigate the sea, where land is.
Are they assigned, or can the countries pick their colors?
—What suits the character or the native waters best.
Topography displays no favorites; North’s as near as West.
More delicate than the historians’ are the map-makers’ colors.

Friday, July 5th

basement jukebox

Billy Stewart (1937-1970), “Sitting in the Park” (B. Stewart), 1965

 

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lagniappe

reading table

Understanding makes the mind lazy.

—Penelope Fitzgerald (1916-2000), The Bookshop

Wednesday, June 12th

basement jukebox

Donny Hathaway (1945-1979), “I Love You More Than You’ll Ever Know” (D. Hathaway), 1972

 

Monday, June 3rd

what’s new

Mavis Staples with Ben Harper, “We Get By” (B. Harper), published 5/15/19

 

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Another take.

Live (TV show), published 5/21/19

 

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lagniappe

musical thoughts

Music Is the Healing Force of the Universe

—album title, saxophonist Albert Ayler, 1969

(Taking a break—back in a while.)

Wednesday, May 8th

basement jukebox

James Carr (1942-2001) with Betty Harris (1939-), “I’m a Fool for You,” 1967 (Billboard R&B #42, Pop #97)

 

Wednesday, April 3rd

basement jukebox

Solomon Burke (1940-2010), “Cry to Me” (Bert Russell AKA Bert Berns), 1962

 

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lagniappe

reading table

Looking back now, in the late autumn of life—or is it early winter?—I am convinced that art and the erotic are as closely entwined as a pair of lovers lying in each other’s arms.

—John Banville (1945-), Time Pieces: A Dublin Memoir

Friday, March 29th

sounds of Chicago

Otis Clay (1942-2016), “Trying to Live My Life Without You” (L. Williams)

Live, Toronto, 2014

 

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Recording, 1972

 

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lagniappe

random sights

yesterday, Forest Park, Ill.

Saturday, March 23rd

two takes

James Carr (1942-2001), “Pouring Water on a Drowning Man” (D. Baker, D. McCormick)

Live, Italy (Porretta Terme), 1992

 

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Recording, 1966

 

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lagniappe

reading table

lingering a while
above the blossoms,
the moon in the night sky

—Matsuo Basho, 1644-1694 (translated from Japanese by Makoto Ueda)

Monday, March 18th

James Carr (1942-2001), “The Dark End of the Street” (D. Penn, C. Moman), 1967

 

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lagniappe

reading table

Counting the Mad
by Donald Justice (1925-2004)

This one was put in a jacket,
This one was sent home,
This one was given bread and meat
But would eat none,
And this one cried No No No No
All day long.

This one looked at the window
As though it were a wall,
This one saw things that were not there,
This one things that were,
And this one cried No No No No
All day long.

This one thought himself a bird,
This one a dog,
And this one thought himself a man,
An ordinary man,
And cried and cried No No No No
All day long.

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