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Tag: Zakir Hussain

Monday, August 13th

sounds of all over

Vijay Iyer (piano), Rudresh Mahanthappa (alto saxophone), Aruna Sairam (vocals), Zakir Hussain (tabla), live, Ojai, Calif., 2017 (performance begins at 16:00)

 

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lagniappe

random sights

this morning, Oak Park, Ill.

Monday, July 16th

sounds of India

Nikhil Banerjee (1931-1986, sitar), Zakir Hussain (1951-, tabla), live (Raag Shyam Kedar, Raag Pilu), San Francisco, 1985

 

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lagniappe

random sights

yesterday, Oak Park, Ill.

Monday, December 11th

more

Nikhil Banerjee (1931-1986), sitar (with Zakir Hussain [1951-; tabla], et al.), Raag Shyam Kedar, Raag Pilu, live, San Francisco, 1985

 

Tuesday, December 27th

After all the holiday bustle, how about something that begins slowly, quietly?

Nikhil Banerjee (1931-1986), sitar (with Zakir Hussain [1951-; tabla], et al.), Raag Shyam Kedar, Raag Pilu, live, San Francisco, 1985


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lagniappe

art beat: other day, Art Institute of Chicago

Agnes Martin (1912-2004), Untitled #12 (detail), 1977

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Saturday, November 7th

sounds of India

If I could sing like this, I’d never close my mouth.

Shankar Mahadevan (vocals) & Zakir Hussain (percussion), live, India, 2014

 

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lagniappe

reading table

spreading wide my narrow Hands / To gather Paradise –

—Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), #466 (Franklin)

Wednesday, October 7th

sounds of India

Hariprasad Chaurasia (bansuri) and Zakir Hussain (tabla), Raga Chandrakauns, live, India (Pune), 1992

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lagniappe

road to the World Series

There’s times I tell myself, ‘Shut up and just watch what’s going on and observe what’s going on and really appreciate a moment.’ Because we have a tendency in our lives to go through a moment quickly.

Cubs manager Joe Maddon

Friday, June 14th

Shivkumar Sharma (santoor) & Zakir Hussain (tabla), live, Tokyo, 1988

#1


#2


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lagniappe

radio

Today it’s all ragas all day at WKCR-FM (Columbia University), where they’re hosting the Ragas Live Festival—24 hours straight of Indian classical music, featuring 24 live in-studio performances.

Tuesday, 4/27/10

Indian Music Festival, part 4

This instrument, in this man’s hands, makes some of the most haunting sounds I’ve ever heard.

Hariprasad Chaurasia, bansuri (bamboo flute), with Zakir Hussain, tabla, Raga Chandrakauns, live, India (Pune), 1992

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lagniappe

Want more Indian music?

part 1: Ali Akbar Khan, sarod

part 2: Nikhil Banerjee, sitar, with Zakir Hussain, tabla

part 3: Shivkumar Sharma, santoor, with Zakir Hussain, tabla

Thursday, 4/1/10

Indian Music Festival, part 3

Light, clear, open: I could listen to this all day.

Shivkumar Sharma, santoor, with Zakir Hussain, tabla

Raga Kausi Kanada, live

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Raga Kirwani, live

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lagniappe

Shivkumar Sharma is responsible for validating the santoor as a classical instrument . . . . and it is especially exciting to hear him with an accomplished tabla master, particularly his long-time collaborator Zakir Hussain.

—Peter Lavezzoli, The Dawn of Indian Music in the West (2006)

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More Indian music?

Every Sunday one of my favorite radio stations, WKCR-FM (broadcasting from Columbia University), offers four hours of Indian music (6-8 a.m., 7-9 p.m. [EST])—records, interviews, studio performances, etc.

Wednesday, 3/31/10

Indian Music Festival, part 2

Nikhil Banerjee, sitar

With Zakir Hussain (tabla), live

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Raga Bhimpalasi (Alap [opening section])

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Raga Bhairavi

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Raga Manj Khammaj, with Ali Akbar Khan (sarod)

Part 1

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Part 2

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lagniappe

In my own listening, I have sometimes felt that a raga symbolizes the states of a person’s life in reverse order. The open-ended introduction, or the alap, with its meditative quality, seems to reflect the wisdom of the elder sage, or sannyasin. As the raga progresses, and the rhythmic pulse and melodic development begins, one meets the adult in full control of his or her faculties in the prime of life. There is a healthy balance between bursts of improvisation and the observance of structure. Toward the end, as the raga accelerates and approaches a climax, one enters the childlike realm, where the desire to display virtuosity is strongest, and the performers throw caution to the wind and go for broke. But for many musicians and connoisseurs, this is where the raga has lost its purity, with the delicate opening alap seen as the “true essence” of raga.—Peter Lavezzoli, The Dawn of Indian Music in the West (2006)

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A musician must lift up the souls of the listeners, and take them towards Space.—Nikhil Banerjee

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