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Tag: Sonny Rollins

Wednesday, April 22nd

passings

Henry Grimes, bassist, November 3, 1935–April 15, 2020

With Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone), Don Cherry (trumpet), Billy Higgins (drums), live, Rome, 1962

 

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With David Murray (tenor saxophone), Hamid Drake (drums, MCOTD Hall of Fame), live, Finland (Kerava), 2004

 

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With Kidd Jordan (tenor saxophone), live, New York, 2010

 

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lagniappe

random sights

yesterday, Chicago (Columbus Park)

Wednesday, May 25th

Unfailing clarity, lyricism—how apt to hear him shortly after Mozart.

Sonny Rollins, live (“On Green Dolphin Street,” “St. Thomas,” “Four”), Denmark, 1968*


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lagniappe

reading table

dripping from the flower vendor’s
display
morning dew

—Kobayashi Issa, 1763-1828 (translated from Japanese by David G. Lanoue)

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*With Kenny Drew (piano), Niels-Henning Orsted Pedersen (bass), Albert “Tootie” Heath (drums).

Wednesday, September 2nd

tenor fest
day three

Sonny Rollins Trio (with Henry Grimes, bass; Joe Harris, drums), “It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing)” (E. K. “Duke” Ellington), live, Sweden, 1959

 

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lagniappe

reading table

frogs sing, roosters sing
the east
turns light

—Kobayashi Issa (1763-1827), translated from Japanese by David G. Lanoue

Tuesday, July 2nd

This is, to these ears, just perfect.

Sonny Rollins Trio (SR, tenor saxophone; Henry Grimes, bass; Pete La Roca, drums), “Weaver of Dreams,” live, Netherlands (Laren), 1959


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lagniappe

random thoughts

What will the world be like without you?

Monday, 10/10/11

Happy Birthday, Thelonious!

Thelonious Monk, composer, pianist, bandleader
October 10, 1917-February 17, 1982 

Monk’s music—its exquisite mix of logic and lyricism—sometimes makes me think of Mozart.

“’Round Midnight” (AKA “’Round About Midnight”) (T. Monk)

Take 1: Bill Evans Trio (BE, piano; Eddie Gomez, bass; Marty Morrell, drums), live, Sweden, 1970

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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Take 2: Don Pullen (piano), rec. 1984 (Don Pullen Plays Monk)

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Take 3: Milt Jackson (vibes), live, Japan, 1990

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More Monk? Here. And here. And here. And here.

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lagniappe

musical thoughts

If it wasn’t for music, man, life wouldn’t be nothing—it’s all about music.

—Thelonious Monk

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Sonny Rollins talks about Monk:

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radio

All Monk, all day: WKCR-FM (broadcasting from Columbia University).

Thursday, 8/25/11

Does anyone have more fun than drummers?

Sonny Rollins/Don Cherry Quartet (SR, tenor saxophone; DC, trumpet; Henry Grimes, bass; Billy Higgins, drums), “52nd Street Theme” (T. Monk), live (TV broadcast), Rome, 1962

Vodpod videos no longer available.

More Sonny Rollins? Here. And here. And here. And here. And here.

More Don Cherry? Here. And here.

More Billy Higgins? Here.

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lagniappe

You know the drum was the first instrument besides the human voice.

Billy Higgins

Monday, 6/20/11

Here’s another take on the blues.

Ben Webster Quartet (BW, tenor saxophone; Stan Tracey, piano; Rick Laird, bass; Jackie Dougan, drums), “Poutin’,” live

Vodpod videos no longer available.

More? Here. And here. And here.

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lagniappe

Sonny Rollins, Joe Lovano, et al., talk about Ben Webster

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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mail

You are sending out some great stuff at all times. . . . It’s always interesting, and the one you sent out today, Onmutu Mechanicks, was especially cool, since I hadn’t ever crossed their path.

Saturday, 1/29/11

replay: clips too good for just one day

I’ve tried listening to his recordings while doing something else, but that hasn’t worked. Whatever else I was doing, I just put aside. If it was nighttime, I turned off the light. Some music occupies every available inch of space—there isn’t room for anything else.

Alfred Cortot: Frederic Chopin, “Farewell” (Waltz in A-flat major, Op. 69, No. 1 [excerpt]); Robert Schumann, “Der Dichter Spricht” (Op. 15, No. 13 in G major [excerpt])

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lagniappe

Cortot looked for the opium in music.

—Daniel Barenboim

(Originally posted 7/13/10.)

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If you want to stay right where you are, don’t even bother with this clip. But if, instead, you’d like to go somewhere you may never have been before, well, this might be just the ticket.

Gyorgy Ligeti (1923-2006), Three Etudes, Pierre-Laurent Aimard, piano

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lagniappe

I listen to all kinds of music—new music, old music, music of my colleagues, everything.

—Gyorgy Ligeti (whose influences included not only the usual suspects [Chopin, Debussy, et al.] but also Thelonious Monk and Bill Evans and the Rainforest Pygmies and fractal geometry)

(Originally posted 10/6/09.)

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Want a break from music that’s busy, busy, busy, busy, busy?

Try this.

Here, it seems, almost nothing happens at all.

Morton Feldman (1926-1987), Intermission 6 (1953)/Clint Davis, piano, live, Lexington, Kentucky, 2009

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lagniappe

To almost everyone’s surprise but his own, he [Morton Feldman] turned out to be one of the major composers of the twentieth century, a sovereign artist who opened up vast, quiet, agonizingly beautiful worlds of sound . . . . In the noisiest century in history, Feldman chose to be glacially slow and snowily soft.—Alex Ross

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Earlier in my life there seemed to be unlimited possibilities, but my mind was closed. Now, years later and with an open mind, possibilities no longer interest me. I seem content to be continually rearranging the same furniture in the same room.—Morton Feldman

(Originally posted 11/7/09.)

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mail, etc.

Congratulations on your 500th post. I don’t know how you do it but I’m definitely looking forward to receiving your next 500 posts. Thanks for exposing me to so many great artists. Keep the music coming and thanks for what you do.

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Lovely [Gulda/Mozart clip].

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The Sonny Rollins clip was amazing and amazing doesn’t do it justice!

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Oh, my goodness—and in such distinguished company as well! Thank you so much, Richard.

All best,
David [Kirby]

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Richard McLeese checked in with some nice memories about Son Seals. Click here to enjoy them yourself, including a couple of great videos.

Andrew Vachss’ website

Saturday, 1/22/11

Thirty-four years ago, on a cold Saturday night, in a church about
thirty miles north of Chicago, tenor saxophonist Von Freeman played this, unaccompanied, at our wedding.

Sonny Rollins (tenor saxophone) with The Modern Jazz Quartet (John Lewis, piano; Milt Jackson, vibraphone; Percy Heath, bass; Kenny Clarke, drums), “In A Sentimental Mood” (Duke Ellington), 1953

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Monday, 1/10/11

Happy Birthday, Max!

No drummer is more clear, more precise, more melodic.

Max Roach, January 10, 1924-August 16, 2007

“The Third Eye,” live

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“The Drum Also Waltzes” (Drums Unlimited), 1966

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With Sonny Rollins (saxophone), “St. Thomas” (Saxophone Colossus), 1956

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With Clifford Brown (trumpet), “Sweet Clifford” (Brown and Roach Incorporated), 1955

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With Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet), Charlie Parker (saxophone), Bud Powell (piano), Charles Mingus (bass), “Salt Peanuts,” live, 1953

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lagniappe

musical thoughts

In this music, you have to find out who you are, what you feel, what you want to say. That’s one of the reasons that it’s so American. You have to be yourself.

That’s also one way jazz is different from classical music. In classical music, you learn to study and come up with the finest interpretation of a work that you can. That’s a different way of expressing your personality. You have to learn to use what’s written already to express yourself. In jazz, you have to learn to be who you are, and create the music from that.

—Max Roach (in Gene Santoro, Highway 61 Revisited [2004])

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radio

Today it’s all Max all day at WKCR-FM (broadcasting from Columbia University).


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