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Tag: Otis Rush

Thursday, November 26th

basement jukebox

J. B. Lenoir (1929-1967), “Mama Talk To Your Daughter,” 1955

 

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Magic Sam (aka Samuel Maghett, 1937-1969), “All Your Love,” 1957

 

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Otis Rush (1934-2018)“All Your Love (I Miss Loving),” 1958

 

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Junior Wells (1934-1998), “Little by Little,” 1960

 

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Buddy Guy (1936-), “First Time I Met the Blues,” 1960

 

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Sonny Boy Williamson II (aka Alex [or Aleck] Miller, 1912-1965), “Help Me,” 1963

 

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Fenton Robinson (1935-1997), “Somebody (Loan Me a Dime),” 1967

 

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lagniappe

random sights

yesterday, Oak Park, Ill.

Wednesday, July 29th

basement jukebox

Otis Rush (1934-2018, vocals, guitar), “All Your Love (I Miss Loving)” (O. Rush), 1959

 

If you take the words from ‘Black Magic Woman’ and just leave the rhythm, it’s ‘All Your Love’—it’s Otis Rush.

—Carlos Santana

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lagniappe

random sights

yesterday, Oak Park, Ill.

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reading table

Roads run forever
Under feet forever
Falling away
Yet, it may happen that you
Come to the same place again
Stay! You could not do
Anything more certain—
Here you can wait forever
And rejoice at your arrival

—Samuel Menashe (1925-2011)

Friday, October 19th

voices I miss

Junior Wells (vocals, harmonica [1934-1998]) with Otis Rush (guitar [1935-2018]), Jack Myers (bass [c. 1937-2011]), Fred Below (drums [1926-1988]), “Hoodoo Man Blues,” live, Berlin, 1966

 

Friday, October 12th

more

Otis Rush (vocals, guitar) with Little Brother Montgomery (piano), Jack Myers (bass), Fred Below (drums), live, Berlin, 1966

“All Your Love (I Miss Loving)”

 

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“Sweet Little Angel”

 

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lagniappe

reading table

The silence will be sudden then last.

—Deborah Landau, from “The Silence Will Be Sudden Then Last” (Poetry, 10/18)

Monday, October 8th

passings

Otis Rush, guitarist, singer, April 29, 1935-September 29, 2018 

Today, remembering him, we revisit a couple of posts.

1/21/10

Otis Rush (with Fred Below [drums], et al.), “I Can’t Quit You Baby,” live, Germany, 1966

 

I was staying with my sister and messing around with the guitar every day for my own amusement. Then she took me around and introduced me to Muddy Waters, Jimmy Rogers, Little Walter, and the first time I saw that onstage, it inspired me to play. I thought that was the world.

—Otis Rush

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9/15/18

basement jukebox

Otis Rush (1934-)

“All Your Love (I Miss Loving),” 1958

 

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“I Can’t Quit You Baby,” 1956

 

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“Double Trouble,” 1958

 

Saturday, September 15th

basement jukebox

Otis Rush (1934-)

“All Your Love (I Miss Loving),” 1958

 

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“I Can’t Quit You Baby,” 1956

 

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“Double Trouble,” 1958

 

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lagniappe

found words

Actor we forgot was married to a model

—AOL

Wednesday, July 11th

basement jukebox

Otis Rush, “All Your Love (I Miss Loving),” 1958

 

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lagniappe

random sights

this morning, Chicago (Columbus Park)

Thursday, December 15th

Chicago blues
day three

Otis Rush (1935-; vocal, guitar) with Fred Below (1926-1988; drums), et al., “I Can’t Quit You Baby,” live, East Berlin, 1966


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Here’s the original 1956 recording.


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lagniappe

reading table

On the first page of the course syllabus [for the class, taught at Columbia, on “The American Radical Tradition”], I always included the words of Max Weber, a rebuke to those who believe that critics of society should set their sights only on “practical” measures: “What is possible would never have been achieved if, in this world, people had not repeatedly reached for the impossible.”

—Eric Foner, “American Radicals and the Change We Could Believe In,” The Nation, January 2-9, 2017 issue

Saturday, 7/14/12

basement jukebox

Otis Rush, singer, guitar player

Where did “Black Magic Woman” come from?

“All Your Love (I Miss Loving),” 1958

If you take the words from ‘Black Magic Woman’ and just leave the rhythm, it’s ‘All Your Love’—it’s Otis Rush.

Carlos Santana

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“I Can’t Quit You Baby,” 1956

Friday, 3/4/11

four takes

Rainy Night In Georgia” (Tony Joe White, 1962)

Brook Benton, 1970 (Billboard Soul Singles #1, Hot 100 #4)

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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Otis Rush, 1976 (rec. 1971)

Vodpod videos no longer available.

(This track’s a mixed bag: he muffs the first line [dropping “the night” after “spend”] and the low notes are a stretch [at least in this key]; but the choruses are terrific, as is the bridge.)

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Conway Twitty with Sam Moore, 1994

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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Tony Joe White, TV broadcast (Netherlands), 2006 (?)

Vodpod videos no longer available.
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