music clip of the day

jazz/blues/rock/classical/gospel/more

Tag: Max Roach

Monday, January 20th

This voice I could listen to all day, even if I didn’t understand a word of English. He doesn’t speak—he sings.

Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968), “I Have a Dream,” Washington, D.C., August 28, 1963

***

Another take, with Max Roach (1924-2007, drums).

 

**********

lagniappe

random sights

yesterday, Oak Park, Ill.

Friday, January 10th

tonight in Chicago

He’s playing at Buddy Guy’s club, opening for Buddy himself.

Kingfish (AKA Christone Ingram, 1999-), “Hey Joe,” live, Tupelo, Miss., 2017

 

**********

langiappe

random sights

other day, Chicago

*****

reading table

a lovely night lit
with oil lamps . . .
croaking frogs

—Kobayashi Issa (1763-1827), translated from Japanese by David G. Lanoue

*****

radio

Today WKCR (Columbia University) is celebrating the birthday of jazz drummer Max Roach (1924-2007), playing his music all day.

Tuesday, March 25th

Happy (85th) Birthday, Cecil!

Cecil Taylor (March 25, 1929-), pianist, composer, MacArthur “genius” grant recipient, 2013 Kyoto Prize Laureate in Arts and Philosophy, etc.

Today, celebrating his musical life, we revisit three favorites.

Live, Germany (Nürnberg), 1984


***

Live (with Rashid Bakr, drums; Thurman Barker, marimba, miscellaneous percussion), 1995


***

Live (with Max Roach, drums), New York (Columbia University), 2000


**********

lagniappe

musical thoughts

I try to imitate on the piano the leaps in space a dancer makes.

—Cecil Taylor

Tuesday, December 24th

Last night this woman, who died of cancer in 2006, was very much alive, singing Bach on the radio.*

Johann Sebastian Bach, “Ich Habe Genug” (“I Have Enough,” church cantata), Lorraine Hunt Lieberson (1954-2006), 2003

**********

lagniappe

Christmas, 1948

Charlie Parker (alto saxophone), Kenny Dorham (trumpet), Al Haig (piano), Tommy Porter (bass), Max Roach (drums), “White Christmas,” live, New York (Royal Roost), 12/25/48

*****

*WKCR-FM (Columbia University), Bach Festival, through New Year’s Eve.

Thursday, 1/10/13

basement jukebox

Robert Ward, “I Will Fear No Evil,” mid-1960s

**********

lagniappe

radio: Happy (89th) Birthday, Max!

WKCR-FM, celebrating the birthday of drummer Max Roach (1924-2007), is featuring his music all day.

Monday, 1/9/12

What do you get when you combine a pianist who plays with the percussive intensity of a drummer and a drummer who plays with the melodic buoyancy of a pianist?

Cecil Taylor (piano), Max Roach (drums), live
New York (Columbia University), 2000

**********

lagniappe

art beat: more from Thursday’s stop at the Art Institute of Chicago (after a hearing at the nearby federal court building)

Mark Rothko, Painting (1953-54)

Tuesday, 5/10/11

Sometimes it takes years—decades even—before you’re really able to hear somebody’s music. The other day, for instance, I put on a CD by this guy, a jazz pianist and composer whose music, which I first encountered 20 or 30 years ago, I’d admired more than enjoyed. I put this on expecting to do some work while it played in the background. But it refused to cooperate. Instead of staying put, it jumped out of the speakers, grabbed me, wouldn’t let go. No work got done.

Herbie Nichols, pianist, composer
January
3, 1919-April 12, 1963

“The Third World”
With Al McKibbon, bass; Art Blakey, drums
Blue Note, 1955

Vodpod videos no longer available.

***

“Applejackin'”
With Al McKibbon, bass; Max Roach, drums
Blue Note, 1955

Vodpod videos no longer available.

***

“House Party Starting”
With Al McKibbon, bass; Max Roach, drums
Blue Note, 1955

Vodpod videos no longer available.

**********

lagniappe

reading table

Like so many of life’s varieties of experience, the novelty of a diagnosis of malignant cancer has a tendency to wear off.

—Christopher Hitchens, “Unspoken Truths,” Vanity Fair, 6/11

Monday, 1/10/11

Happy Birthday, Max!

No drummer is more clear, more precise, more melodic.

Max Roach, January 10, 1924-August 16, 2007

“The Third Eye,” live

Vodpod videos no longer available.

***

“The Drum Also Waltzes” (Drums Unlimited), 1966

Vodpod videos no longer available.

***

With Sonny Rollins (saxophone), “St. Thomas” (Saxophone Colossus), 1956

Vodpod videos no longer available.

***

With Clifford Brown (trumpet), “Sweet Clifford” (Brown and Roach Incorporated), 1955

Vodpod videos no longer available.

***

With Dizzy Gillespie (trumpet), Charlie Parker (saxophone), Bud Powell (piano), Charles Mingus (bass), “Salt Peanuts,” live, 1953

Vodpod videos no longer available.

**********

lagniappe

musical thoughts

In this music, you have to find out who you are, what you feel, what you want to say. That’s one of the reasons that it’s so American. You have to be yourself.

That’s also one way jazz is different from classical music. In classical music, you learn to study and come up with the finest interpretation of a work that you can. That’s a different way of expressing your personality. You have to learn to use what’s written already to express yourself. In jazz, you have to learn to be who you are, and create the music from that.

—Max Roach (in Gene Santoro, Highway 61 Revisited [2004])

*****

radio

Today it’s all Max all day at WKCR-FM (broadcasting from Columbia University).


Saturday, 10/30/10

Happy Birthday, Brownie!

Clifford Brown, October 30, 1930-June 26, 1956

“Oh, Lady Be Good,” “Memories of You,” live (TV broadcast [Soupy’s On, Detroit]), 1955

*****

Clifford Brown/Max Roach Quintet (Clifford Brown, trumpet; Max Roach, drums; Sonny Rollins, tenor saxophone; Richie Powell, piano; George Morrow, bass)

Live, “Get Happy”

*****

Live, Virginia (Norfolk, Continental Restaurant), 6/18/1956 (Last Concert)

“You Go To My Head”

***

“What’s New”

**********

lagniappe

Don’t take a trumpet player, man. You won’t need one after you hear this young cat, Clifford Brown.

Charlie Parker (to Art Blakey, when he was going to work in Philadelphia in the early 1950s)

***

Out in California, we had a house, and we had a piano and vibes as well as trumpet and drums. Brownie could play all these instruments, you know. I would go out of the house and come back, and he would be practicing on anything, drums, vibes, anything. He loved music.

Max Roach

***

He was so well-rounded in all music. He liked Miles, Trane—who was very young then—and Louis Armstrong, and Lee Morgan, who spent alot of time with Clifford in Philly. Eric Dolphy was another good friend of ours. Music was his first love; I was his second, and math was his third. He was a wizard with figures and numbers; he used to play all kinds of mathematical games. . . .

There was only one time I didn’t travel with him. Our child, Clifford Jr., had been born, and I hadn’t taken him home yet to see the family. So Clifford said okay, and he put us on the plane; and of course that was when he was in the car accident and was killed. It was our second wedding anniversary and my 22nd birthday.

Larue Brown Watson

***

Without Brownie, it would be hard to imagine the existence of Lee Morgan or Freddie Hubbard or Booker Little or Woody Shaw or Wynton Marsalis.

Michael Cuscuna

*****

radio

Today, at WKCR-FM (broadcasting from Columbia University), it’s all Brownie, (almost) all day. (This birthday celebration will be interrupted in the middle of the day for coverage of the Columbia/Yale football game.)

Wednesday, 7/21/10

getting older

“Where did everybody go?” you wonder.

With each passing year, more of the musicians who’ve shaped your world—who’ve made life sing—are gone.

Ed Blackwell, Lester Bowie, Betty Carter, Malachi Favors, Steve Lacy, Kate McGarrigle, Art Pepper, Professor Longhair, Sun Ra, Junior Wells, Julius Hemphill (below): the list goes on, and on, and on.

World Saxophone Quartet (Julius Hemphill, alto saxophone; Oliver Lake, soprano and alto saxophones; David Murray, tenor saxophone; Hamiet Bluiett, baritone saxophone)

Medley: “West African Snap,” “I Heard That,” “Fast Life,” “Hattie Wall,” live (TV Broadcast [Night Music]), 1990 (music starts at 2:20)

Listening to Julius Hemphill (far left), a phrase from Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech comes to mind: “the fierce urgency of now.” Hemphill has, it seems, so much to say—right now. Listen, for instance, to 4:30-6:35.

*****

Live, with M’Boom (Max Roach’s 9-piece percussion ensemble), New York (The Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine), 1981 (music starts at 1:55)

Want more? Here.

**********

lagniappe

musical thoughts

Without music, life would be an error.

—Friedrich Nietzsche


%d bloggers like this: