music clip of the day

jazz/blues/rock/classical/gospel/more

Tag: Mavis Staples

Sunday, July 28th

sounds of Chicago

This I could listen to all day.

Staple Singers, “Pray On” (R. Staples), live (TV show), Chicago, 1966

 

**********

lagniappe

random sights

other day, Oak Park, Ill.

Monday, June 3rd

what’s new

Mavis Staples with Ben Harper, “We Get By” (B. Harper), published 5/15/19

 

***

Another take.

Live (TV show), published 5/21/19

 

**********

lagniappe

musical thoughts

Music Is the Healing Force of the Universe

—album title, saxophonist Albert Ayler, 1969

(Taking a break—back in a while.)

Friday, September 23rd

How strange it seems, still, that he should be dead.

Prince with Mavis Staples, et al., live, England (King’s Cross), 1993


**********

lagniappe

art beat: yesterday, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago

Kerry James Marshall (1955-), Slow Dance, 1992-93 (Kerry James Marshall, Mastry, through 9/25/16)

kerry-james-marshall-slow-dance-1992-1000

 

Sunday, February 7th

sounds of Chicago

Jubilee Showcase (TV show), Chicago, 1963-1984


***

 

**********

lagniappe

random sights

other day, Oak Park, Ill.

IMG_2707 (1)

Sunday, November 9th

That gospel feeling is in all of this music.

—Solomon Burke

Soul Deep: The Story of Black Popular Music, Episode 2: Sam Cooke, with Mavis Staples, Bobby Womack, Solomon Burke, Ben E. King, et al., BBC, 2005

#1


#2


#3


#4

**********

lagniappe

art beat: more from Friday at the Art Institute of Chicago

Arshile Gorky (1904-1948), The Plough and the Song, 1946

131404_2407039

Wednesday, November 13th

Here’s a variation, from the 1960s civil rights struggles, on the gospel song we heard Sunday.

SNCC Freedom Singers (AKA The Freedom Singers), “Woke Up This Morning with My Mind on Freedom,” live, Turkey, 2007

We started singing songs at the mass meetings. Songs of the movement gave you energy–a willingness and a wantingness to want to be free. Whenever there was a march to be taken place, there were songs that we would use to motivate the people to get in the line. One such song was “I Woke Up This Morning with My Mind Stayed on Freedom.” Most of the songs from the movement were taken from spirituals, gospel, and rhythm and blues–any type of music. Someone in the audience would start and say, “Come and go with me to that land. Come and go with me to that land.” And the rest would just repeat it.

Rutha Mae Harris, SNCC Freedom Singers

*****

And here’s another take on the original.

Mavis Staples, “Woke Up This Morning with My Mind on Jesus,” recording (One True Vine), 2013

**********

lagniappe

art beat

Danny Lyon (1942-), Atlanta (Toddle House), 1963

sit in tottle house lyon

Sunday, October 27th

sounds of Chicago

They sounded so good last week—let’s hear some more.

The Staple Singers, “Are You Sure,” live, 1971


**********

lagniappe

art beat

William Eggleston (1939-)

Chrome-William-Eggleston-Steidl-2011-www.lylybye.blogspot.com_6

 

Sunday, October 20th

sounds of Chicago

The Staple Singers, “Sit Down Servant,” live (TV show), 1963


**********

lagniappe

art beat

Helen Levitt (1913-2009), New York, c. 1940

Levitt_Bubbles

Friday, June 28th

what’s new

Mavis Staples, “I Like The Things About Me” (R. Staples & M. Stubbs), One True Vine, 6/13

**********

lagniappe

random thoughts

Language, no matter how much it’s used, never seems to get used up. Take this sentence, for instance, which opens Donald Ray Pollock’s story collection Knockemstiff: “My father showed me how to hurt a man one August night at the Torch Drive-in when I was seven years old.” Not one of these words is unusual, nor is the syntax. But this particular set of words, in this particular order, never existed before. How improbable is that?

Sunday, 11/13/11

No one today—not even Mavis herself—takes you the places she did
in her prime.

The Staple Singers (featuring Mavis Staples), “We’ll Get Over”
TV broadcast (The Johnny Cash Show), 1969

Time for just a few notes? 2:37-40.

More Mavis? Here. And here. And here.

%d bloggers like this: