music clip of the day

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Tag: John Hicks

Tuesday, May 11th

timeless

Johnny Griffin/Woody Shaw Quintet (JG, 1928-2008, tenor saxophone; WS, 1944-1989, trumpet; John Hicks, 1941-2006, piano; Reggie Johnson, 1940-2020, bass; Alvin Queen, drums, 1950-), live, Germany (Cologne), 1986

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lagniappe

random sights

other day, Oak Park, Ill.

Saturday, July 18th

timeless 

Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers (AB, drums; John Gilmore, tenor saxophone; Lee Morgan, trumpet; John Hicks, piano; Victor Sproles, bass), live (music starts at 4:25), Paris, 1965

 

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lagniappe

random sights

yesterday, Chicago

*****

reading table

If I had known
how sorrowful this world is,
I would have become
grass or a tree
in a deep mountain!

—Ryokan (1758-1831), translated from Japanese by Kazuaki Tanahashi

Monday, December 16th

sounds of New York

David Murray Quartet (DM, 1955-, tenor saxophone; John Hicks, 1941-2006, piano; Fred Hopkins, 1947-1999, bass; Ed Blackwell, 1929-1992, drums), live, New York (Village Vanguard), 1986

 

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lagniappe

random sights

yesterday, Oak Park, Ill.

Tuesday, March 28th

bad news/good news

Bad news: You’ve heard nothing this good in who knows how long.

Good news: You’re about to hear this.

Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers (AB, drums; John Gilmore, tenor saxophone; Lee Morgan, trumpet; John Hicks, piano; Victor Sproles, bass), “On The Ginza,” “Lament for Stacey,” “The Egyptian,” “I Can’t Get Started,” “Buhaina’s Delight,” live (TV show), London, 1964

 

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art beat

Robert Frank (1924-), Rooming house—Bunker Hill, Los Angeles, 1955/56

 

Monday, February 29th

timeless

One of my favorite ballads.

“I Can’t Get Started” (V. Duke & I. Gershwin), Art Blakey (drums), John Gilmore (tenor saxophone), Lee Morgan (trumpet), John Hicks (piano), Victor Sproles (bass), live (TV show), London, 1964


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lagniappe

reading table

What I try to do is not miss anything.

—Cubs manager Joe Maddon, on his goal at work each day

Wednesday, 2/15/12

the ecstatic impulse

Pharoah Sanders, tenor saxophonist, composer, bandleader, 1940-

“You’ve Got To Have Freedom” (P. Sanders)

Take 1: Live (with William Henderson, piano; James Leary, bass; Kharon Harrison, drums), Los Angeles, 2011

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Take 2: Live (with John Hicks, piano; Walter Booker, bass; Idris Muhammad, drums), Los Angeles, 1981 (Live [Evidence])

More? Here.

Jazz, R&B, gospel—listening to him you’re reminded, again, that they all come from the same place.

Saturday, 8/7/10

Let’s lift the bandstand.

—Thelonious Monk

Woody Shaw/Johnny Griffin Quintet (Woody Shaw, trumpet; Johnny Griffin, tenor saxophone; John Hicks, piano; Reggie Johnson, bass; Alvin Queens, drums), “Night in Tunisia,” live, Germany (Koln), 1986

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Now there’s a great trumpet player. He [Woody Shaw] can play different from all of them.

—Miles Davis

*****

Anthony Braxton on playing with Woody Shaw.

*****

reading table

Look after the sound and the sense will take care of itself.

—Adam Phillips, London Review of Books, 7/22/10 (reviewing Christopher Ricks’ True Friendship: Geoffrey Hill, Anthony Hecht and Robert Lowell Under The Sign Of Eliot And Pound)

Wednesday, 2/10/10

The term “sideman” can be misleading. It suggests a leader/soloist who reigns supreme while the other musicians serve merely as accompanists.  But the strongest jazz performances, especially live ones, rarely work that way—they’re all about interplay. Here, on piano, bass, and drums, are three of the finest jazz musicians in recent memory. Each contributes mightily to the quality of this performance. All, alas, are now gone.

David Murray, tenor saxophone, with John Hicks, piano; Fred Hopkins, bass; Ed Blackwell, drums; “Morning Song,” live, New York (Village Vanguard), 1986

Part 1

Here are just a few of the things I love about what these guys do:

:14-16, :45-48, 1:17-20: Hopkins can be both fat and precise, funky and elegant. What other bassist pops so impeccably?

4:04-4:22: This is pure Blackwell: a delicate counterpoint dance that lifts everything without ever calling attention to itself.

5:25-42, 6:00-05: Some musicians play “inside” the chord changes and structure, some play “outside”; only a few, like Hicks, are able to do both at once, delineating the changes and structure while at the same time subverting them.

*****

Part 2

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lagniappe

mail

Great! [T. L. Barrett]

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I love your music clips . . . . Listening to Gil Scott-Heron right now, in fact.

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love this . . . thank you for including me! [Jimmie Dale Gilmore]

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