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Tag: Jo Jones

Tuesday, February 25th

old stuff

Kansas City Six (Buck Clayton, trumpet; Lester Young, clarinet; Eddie Durham, electric guitar; Freddie Green, rhythm guitar; Walter Page, bass; Jo Jones, drums), “Pagin’ the Devil,” 1938

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lagniappe

reading table

in blossoming trees
suddenly he’s hidden . . .
my son

—Kobayashi Issa (1763-1827; translated from Japanese by David G. Lanoue)

Thursday, May 23rd

Some singers are so distinctive that when you’re in the mood for them no one else will do.

Blossom Dearie (1924-2009), “They Say It’s Spring,” 1958*

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lagniappe

reading table: Albion Beatnik Bookstore, Oxford, England

0531_7eac

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*BD, vocals, piano; Herb Ellis, guitar; Ray Brown, bass; Jo Jones, drums.

Saturday, 11/24/12

Happy 100th Birthday, Teddy!

Teddy Wilson, pianist, November 24, 1912-July 31, 1986

“Rosetta,” 1934

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“Body and Soul,” with the Benny Goodman Trio (BG, clarinet; TW, piano; Gene Krupa, drums), 1935

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“Foolin’ Myself,” Teddy Wilson Orchestra (TW, piano; Billie Holiday, vocals; Lester Young, tenor saxophone; Freddie Green, guitar; Jo Jones, drums, et al.), 1937

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lagniappe

radio

WKCR-FM’s celebration of his centennial, which I mentioned the other day, runs through midnight Sunday.

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musical thoughts

John Cage (whose centennial we recently celebrated), Conlon Nancarrow (ditto), Teddy Wilson—they’d make a helluva band.

Monday, 10/22/12

old stuff

The great thing about the 21st century is that it’s so easy to leave.

Count Basie Orchestra (Don Byas, tenor saxophone; Harry “Sweets” Edison and Buck Clayton, trumpets; Freddie Green, guitar; Jo Jones, drums, et al.), “Dance of the Gremlins,” “Swingin’ the Blues,” 1941

Monday, 3/5/12

Has there ever been a finer hour of jazz—of music—on TV?

The Sound of Jazz (CBS), 1957*

(A couple excerpts have been posted previously—here and here—but until the other day I’d never seen the whole show.)

*With Count Basie (piano), Thelonious Monk (piano), Billie Holiday (vocals), Jimmy Rushing (vocals), Coleman Hawkins (tenor saxophone), Ben Webster (tenor saxophone), Lester Young (tenor saxophone), Gerry Mulligan (baritone saxophone), Jimmy Giuffre (tenor saxophone, clarinet), Pee Wee Ellis (clarinet), Henry “Red” Allen (trumpet), Roy Eldridge (trumpet), Vic Dickenson (trombone), Danny Barker (guitar), Freddie Green (guitar), Jim Hall (guitar), Milt Hinton (bass), Jo Jones (drums), et al.

Sunday, 11/6/11

two takes

“Don’t sit around in a dead church and die!”

Take 1: Brother Anthony Wynn (Oasis Ministries, Riceville, Tennessee)

*****

Take 2: Sensimo

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lagniappe

listening room: (some of) what’s playing

• Theo Parrish, Sound Sculptures, Vol. 1 (Sound Signature)

• Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Come On Back (Rounder)

• Rare & Collectible Fine Wine: 27 Soulful Ultra-Obscurities From the Cellars (WMFU-FM 2011 Premium; Mr. Fine Wine, Downtown Soulville)

• Cooking Cherries (WMFU-FM 2011 Premium; Terre T, The Cherry Blossom Clinic)

• Miles Davis, The Legendary Prestige Quintet Sessions (Prestige)

• Don Pullen Plays Monk (Why Not)

• Lucky 7s, Farragut (Lakefront Digital)

• Julius Hemphill, One Atmosphere (Tzadik)

• Wadada Leo Smith’s Golden Quartet, with WLS, trumpet; Anthony Davis, piano; Malachi Favors, bass; Jack DeJohnette, drums (Tzakik)

• Goodbye, Babylon (Dust-to-Digital)

• Nikhil Banerjee, Raga Purabi Kaylan (Raga)

• Bela Bartok, String Quartets, Keller Quartet (Erato), Hungarian String Quartet (Deutsche Grammaphon), Takacs Quartet (Decca)

• Anton Bruckner, Symphony No. 6, North German Radio Orchestra (Gunter Wand, conductor) (RCA Victor)

• Morton Feldman, For Bunita Marcus, Markus Hinterhauser, piano (Col Legno [import])

• Morton Feldman, Three Voices, Joan La Barbara (New Albion)

• Morton Feldman, Piano and String Quartet, Aki Takahashi, Kronos Quartet (Nonesuch)

• WKCR-FM (broadcasting from Columbia University)

—Jo Jones Centennial Festival
—Thelonious Monk birthday broadcast
Bird Flight (Phil Schaap, jazz [Charlie Parker])
Traditions in Swing (Phil Schaap, jazz)
Eastern Standard Time (Carter Van Pelt, Jamaican music)
Amazing Grace (various, gospel)
Rag Aur Taal (various, Indian)
Jazz Profiles (various, jazz)
Out to Lunch (various, jazz)

• WFMU-FM

Mudd Up! (DJ/Rupture“new bass and beats”)
Sinner’s Crossroads 
(Kevin Nutt, gospel)
Give the Drummer Some (Doug Schulkind, sui generis, Web only)
Daniel Blumin
Cherry Blossom Clinic (Terre T, rock, etc.)
Antique Phonograph Music Program (MAC, “78s and cylinders . . . played on actual period reproducing devices”)
HotRod (“Shamanic vibrational love frequencies for the infinite mind,” Web only)

• WHPK-FM (broadcasting from University of Chicago)

The Blues Excursion (Arkansas Red)

Friday, 10/7/11

It’s easy to forget, sometimes, just how great somebody could be.

B.B. King, “How Blue Can You Get?”
Live, Sing Sing Prison (Ossining, New York), 1972

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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lagniappe

last night

W. S. Merwin, who just finished a term as U.S. Poet Laureate, gave a reading at Chicago’s downtown library, where he talked about this and that:

The English language is a great dump. Everything that has come into it has stayed there.

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Poetry begins . . . with listening.

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I wanted to be open . . . to anything that sounded like poetry.

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To animals the meaning is the sound—and that’s pretty close to poetry.

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Time is one of the great human fictions.

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Many of the most important things we do are not calculated. They take us by surprise.

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What the arts are made of is nothing but pure attention.

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radio

Happy (100th) Birthday, Papa Jo! WCKR-FMs Centennial Festival, mentioned Monday, continues until noon tomorrow.

Monday, 10/3/11

why I love radio

Beginning yesterday afternoon and continuing until noon Saturday, WKCR-FM, which broadcasts from Columbia University, is celebrating the centennial of Papa Jo Jones—the “greatest drummer who ever lived,” according to the station’s Phil Schaap—in the best possible way: they’re playing his music (with Count Basie, Billie Holiday, et al.), and nothing but his music, 24 hours a day. Breakfast, he’s on; lunch, he’s on; dinner, he’s on; bedtime, he’s on—and it’s all free.* Is this a great life, or what?

Here at MCOTD, we’re celebrating Papa Jo, too—with this clip, a favorite.

*****

He doesn’t pummel the beat, the way so many drummers do.

He pulls it out of the air.

Jo Jones (“Papa Jo” [as distinguished from “Philly Joe“]), October 7, 1911-September 3, 1985

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lagniappe

[W]hat really distinguished the great drummers I heard growing up, what really attracted me to men such as Sonny Greer, Chick Webb, Sid Catlett, Jo Jones and Kenny Clarke was that they all thought like composers, they all had their own way of hearing a band. They were all original thinkers who identified themselves when they played. And they stood out. They played like leaders.

Max Roach

(Originally posted 8/5/10.)

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*“Free” is a bit misleading; it costs money to keep this daily miracle on the air, so, periodically, WKCR-FM solicits contributions. If you tune in and like what you hear, perhaps you, too, could kick in a few bucks.

Saturday, 8/27/11

Happy Birthday, Lester!

Lester Young, tenor saxophonist, August 27, 1909-March 15, 1959

Lester Young (ts) with Carl “Tatti” Smith (trumpet), Count Basie (piano), Walter Page (bass), Jo Jones (drums) (10/9/36, Chicago)

“Oh, Lady Be Good”

Vodpod videos no longer available.

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“Shoe Shine Boy”

Vodpod videos no longer available.

More? Here. And here.

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lagniappe

radio: 72 glorious hours

Assuming Irene doesn’t crash the party, the folks at WKCR-FM (broadcasting from Columbia University)* will be playing Lester Young all day today and into tomorrow, when, at some point, they’ll make the transition to Charlie Parker, whose birthday is Monday. As I wrote last year: “Something happens—something delicious—when you surrender your ears and yourself to someone’s music for such a sustained period of time. Little by little, that musician moves in, taking up residence in your brain. Their distinctive voice becomes, for a time, inseparable from everything else you’re hearing and seeing and thinking and feeling.”

*Later note (2:45 p.m. [CST]): When I just checked, their website seemed to be down; you can also get them via iTunes (radio/college).

Thursday, 8/5/10

He doesn’t pummel the beat, the way so many drummers do.

He pulls it out of the air.

Jo Jones (“Papa Jo” [as distinguished from “Philly Joe“]), October 7, 1911-September 3, 1985

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lagniappe

[W]hat really distinguished the great drummers I heard growing up, what really attracted me to men such as Sonny Greer, Chick Webb, Sid Catlett, Jo Jones and Kenny Clarke was that they all thought like composers, they all had their own way of hearing a band. They were all original thinkers who identified themselves when they played. And they stood out. They played like leaders.

Max Roach

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