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Tag: Friedrich Gulda

Saturday, February 10th

more

Does any pianist play Mozart with more verve?

Friedrich Gulda (1930-2000) playing Mozart (Sonata in D major [K 311], Sonata in F major [K 332]), Germany (Munich), 1991

 

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lagniappe

art beat: other day, Art Institute of Chicago

Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), Fruits of the Midi, 1881

Saturday, February 3rd

You can listen, on NPR, CNN, XYZ, to today’s noise (Trump: “This is an American disgrace!”), or you can listen to this—your call.

Friedrich Gulda (1930-2000) playing Mozart (Sonata in F major [K 332], Fantasy in C minor [K 475], Sonata in C minor [K 457]), Germany (Munich), 1990

 

Thursday, September 28th

never enough

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), Piano Sonata No. 12 in F major (:07-), Fantasia in C minor (22:42-), Sonata No. 14 in C minor (39:54-); Friedrich Gulda (1930-2000), live, Germany (Munich), 1990


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lagniappe

random sights

this morning, Oak Park, Ill.

*****

Thursday, August 24th

never enough

Frederic Chopin (1810-1849), Prelude No. 15 in D flat major (“Raindrop”); Friedrich Gulda (1930-2000), piano

 

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lagniappe

reading table

dragonfly—
flying two feet,
then two feet more

—Kobayashi Issa, 1763-1827 (translated from Japanese by David G. Lanoue)

Wednesday, May 31st

two takes

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Piano Sonata No. 13 in B-flat major

Friedrich Gulda (1930-2000), live


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Vladimir Horowitz (1903-1989), live


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lagniappe

musical thoughts

Whenever life begins to crush me, I know I can rely on Bandol, garlic, and Mozart.

—Jim Harrison (1937-2016), A Really Big Lunch (2017)

 

Thursday, March 16th

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), Piano Concerto No. 26 in D major (“Coronation”); Munich Philharmonic Orchestra with Friedrich Gulda (conducting, piano), live, 1986


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lagniappe

reading table

How I wish I’d been a painter . . . that must really be the best profession—none of this fiddling around with words—there are a couple of Daumiers at the Phillips that make me feel my whole life has been wasted.

—Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979), letter, 1977

Wednesday, March 15th

more

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), Piano Sonatas 9 (D major; K. 311) and 12 (F major; K. 332);  Friedrich Gulda (1930-2000), live


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lagniappe

random sights

other day, Chicago (Rookery Building)

Tuesday, March 14th

never enough

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor; Munich Philharmonic Orchestra with Friedrich Gulda (conducting, piano), live


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lagniappe

random sights

today, Oak Park, Ill.

Monday, May 23rd

I love his approach to Mozart. He’s never fussy or mannered. He plays simply, directly—like a bird flying from tree to tree.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), Piano Sonata No. 12 in F major (:07-), Fantasia in C minor (22:42-), Sonata No. 14 in C minor (39:54-); Friedrich Gulda (1930-2000), live, Germany (Munich), 1990


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lagniappe

musical thoughts

Mozart was a kind of idol to me—this rapturous singing . . . that’s always on the edge of sadness and melancholy and disappointment and heartbreak, but always ready for an outburst of the most delicious music.

Saul Bellow (1915-2005)

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reading table

If, instead of the words ‘good’ or ‘right’ (or ‘sacred’) we use the words ‘beautiful’ or ‘pleasurable’ or ‘enlivening,’ . . . how would our lives be different?

—Adam Phillips, Unforbidden Pleasures (quoted in yesterday’s New York Times Book Review)

Saturday, January 10th

alone

This guy breathes life into whatever he plays. The other day we heard a Beethoven performance from 1993. Here he is in 1964.

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue; Friedrich Gulda (1930-2000), piano, live, 1964

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lagniappe

reading table

‘[O]ur days on Earth are numbered, and the numbers are not that big.’

—Samantha Harvey, Dear Thief

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