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Tag: Charmaine Lee

Tuesday, May 25th

like nobody else

Charmaine Lee (voice), live, published 4/20/21

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lagniappe

random sights

yesterday, Oak Park, Ill.

Thursday, July 9th

sounds of New York

Joe Morris (guitar), Sam Newsome (soprano saxophone, preparations), Charmaine Lee (voice, electronics), live, New York, 2018

 

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lagniappe

random sights

this morning, Chicago (Columbus Park)

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reading table

Do search. But in order to find other than what is searched for.

—painter Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993), Washington Post, 7/7/20

Saturday, June 27th

like nobody else

Charmaine Lee (voice), live (Quarantine Concert presented by Experimental Sound Studio, Chicago), 4/17/20

 

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lagniappe

art beat: Museum of Modern Art, New York, 3/6/20

Jackson Pollock (1912-1956), Number 1A, 1948 (detail)

Thursday, November 29th

more

Charmaine Lee (composition, voice) with Wet Ink Ensemble and guests (Ingrid Laubrock, tenor saxophone; Darius Jones, alto saxophone; Peter Evans, trumpet; Weston Olencki, trombone; Erin Lesser, flute; Alex Mincek, tenor saxophone; Ian Antonio, percussion; Eric Wubbels, piano; Josh Modney, violin; Kate Soper, voice; Sam Pluta, electronics), Smoke, Airs, live, New York, 2018

Wednesday, November 28th

what’s new

How many singers invent their own language?

Charmaine Lee, live, New York, 11/20/18

 

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lagniappe

reading table

The difference between Despair
And Fear, is like the One
Between the instant of a Wreck
And when the Wreck has been —
The Mind is smooth —
No Motion — Contented as the Eye
Upon the Forehead of a Bust —
That knows it cannot see —

—Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), 576 (Franklin)

Tuesday, December 20th

sounds of New York

Charmaine Lee (vocal) & Nate Wooley (trumpet), live, New York, 11/20/16


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lagniappe

reading table

If novelists know anything it’s that individual citizens are internally plural: they have within them the full range of behavioral possibilities. They are like complex musical scores from which certain melodies can be teased out and others ignored or suppressed, depending, at least in part, on who is doing the conducting. At this moment, all over the world—and most recently in America—the conductors standing in front of this human orchestra have only the meanest and most banal melodies in mind. Here in Germany you will remember these martial songs; they are not a very distant memory. But there is no place on earth where they have not been played at one time or another. Those of us who remember, too, a finer music must try now to play it, and encourage others, if we can, to sing along.

—Zadie Smith, “On Optimism and Despair,” (“A talk given in Berlin on November 10 on receiving the 2016 Welt Literature Prize.”), New York Review of Books, 12/22/16 issue

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