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Tag: Bob Marley

Saturday, April 20th

timeless

Wailers (Bob Marley, vocals, guitar; Peter Tosh, vocals, guitar; Bunny Wailer, vocals, percussion, et al.), “Stir It Up” (B. Marley), live (studio), London,  1973

 

Friday, June 13th

sounds of Brazil & Jamaica

Slavish imitation. Contrived reinvention. Tributes usually leave me wondering why they even bothered. Not this.

Gilberto Gil (1942-), Tribute to Bob Marley, live, Brazil (Sao Paulo), 2001

Saturday, 4/21/12

The Wailers, live, Los Angeles, 1973*

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lagniappe

musical thoughts

Music comes up more often in my work as a criminal defense lawyer than you might think. Recently I devoted a lot of time to a case involving a Jamaican guy, a sweet-tempered 64-year-old Rasta, who was charged with a federal immigration offense. It helped a lot, early in our relationship, to be able to talk about seeing Bob Marley in the mid-70s at a small Chicago club (Quiet Knight). And when I’d see him at the jail, talking about music (Marley, Sugar Minott, Gregory Isaacs, et al.) gave us a way to leave behind, if only briefly, the concrete walls and the locked doors and the glass window separating us. (At his sentencing hearing earlier this week, the judge, rejecting the prosecutor’s call for a minimum of 70 months’ incarceration, gave him 30 months, meaning, with credit for time served and “good time,” he’ll do less than a year.)

*****

*In 1974, following the departure of Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer (AKA Bunny Livingston), the band became known as Bob Marley and the Wailers.

Thursday, 12/29/11

more favorites from the past year

Dub shows aren’t an everyday thing in Chicago, so last night, despite the weather (rain) and weariness (from traveling to see a client in prison), I ventured out to a club to catch this guy. A show like this isn’t just an aural experience: each beat of the bass vibrates your ribcage.

Mad Professor (AKA Neil Fraser, born 1955, Guyana)  

Live, London, 2011

Vodpod videos no longer available.

******

Live remix, Bob Marley and the Wailers, “Lively Up Yourself,” c. 2008

Vodpod videos no longer available.

(Originally posted 9/19/11.)

*******

Life thickens as you get older, becoming more layered. The other night, for instance, listening to Mad Professor dub Bob Marley at a club on Chicago’s south side (Reggie’s, State near Cermak), I found it hard not to think of another night over thirty years ago, of another club on the other side of town (Quiet Knight, Belmont near Clark, now gone), of hearing Bob Marley not dubbed but live.

Bob Marley and the Wailers, “Trenchtown Rock”
Live, Chicago (Quiet Knight), 1975

Vodpod videos no longer available.

(Originally posted 9/20/11.)

Tuesday, 9/20/11

Life thickens as you get older, becoming more layered. The other night, for instance, listening to Mad Professor dub Bob Marley at a club on Chicago’s south side (Reggie’s, State near Cermak), I found it hard not to think of another night over thirty years ago, of another club on the other side of town (Quiet Knight, Belmont near Clark, now gone), of hearing Bob Marley not dubbed but live.

Bob Marley and the Wailers, “Trenchtown Rock”
Live, Chicago (Quiet Knight), 1975

Vodpod videos no longer available.

More? Here. And here. And here.

Monday, 9/19/11

Dub shows aren’t an everyday thing in Chicago, so last night, despite the weather (rain) and weariness (from traveling to see a client in prison), I ventured out to a club to catch this guy. A show like this isn’t just an aural experience: each beat of the bass vibrates your ribcage.

Mad Professor (AKA Neil Fraser, born 1955, Guyana)  

Live, London, 2011

Vodpod videos no longer available.

******

Live remix, Bob Marley and the Wailers, “Lively Up Yourself,” c. 2008

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Tuesday, 1/25/11

three takes

Is this—the new cover—great?

Maybe, maybe not.

No matter—I, uh (to dip into the aging hipster’s lexicon), dig it.

“Is This Love” (Bob Marley)

Corinne Bailey Rae

Take 1: recording, 2010

Vodpod videos no longer available.

***

Take 2: live, Los Angeles, 2010

Vodpod videos no longer available.

***

Bob Marley

Take 3: live, Santa Barbara, 1979

Vodpod videos no longer available.

More Bob Marley? Here.

Friday, 12/11/09

Wednesday’s featured artist, Curtis Mayfield, was so popular and influential among Jamaican musicians, including the early Wailers (back when the group included Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer [before becoming “Bob Marley and . . .”]), that one British deejay dubbed him the “Godfather of Reggae.”

The Wailers (with Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, and Bunny Wailer), “Keep On Moving” (1972)

Want more? Here (don’t miss “Soul Shakedown Party”).

*****

The Impressions (with Curtis Mayfield), “I Gotta Keep on Moving” (1964)

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lagniappe

reading table

It’s odd to think back on the time—not so long ago—when there were distinct stylistic trends, such as “this season’s colour” or “abstract expressionism” or “psychedelic music.” It seems we don’t think like that any more. There are just too many styles around, and they keep mutating too fast to assume that kind of dominance.

As an example, go into a record shop and look at the dividers used to separate music into different categories. There used to be about a dozen: rock, jazz, ethnic, and so on. Now there are almost as many dividers as there are records, and they keep proliferating.

***

We’re living in a stylistic tropics. There’s a whole generation of people able to access almost anything from almost anywhere, and they don’t have the same localised stylistic sense that my generation grew up with. It’s all alive, all “now,” in an ever-expanding present, be it Hildegard of Bingen or a Bollywood soundtrack. The idea that something is uncool because it’s old or foreign has left the collective consciousness.

I think this is good news. As people become increasingly comfortable with drawing their culture from a rich range of sources—cherry-picking whatever makes sense to them—it becomes more natural to do the same thing with their social, political and other cultural ideas. The sharing of art is a precursor to the sharing of other human experiences, for what is pleasurable in art becomes thinkable in life.—Brian Eno, 11/18/09

*****

MEMO

To: Elliott Carter

From: MCOTD

Happy 101st Birthday!

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