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Tag: Artur Schnabel

Saturday, February 1st

If you learned you had a month to live, what would you want to listen to? This would be on my list. (Whatever you do, don’t miss the third movement.)

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827), Piano Sonata No. 31 in A flat (Op. 110); Solomon (AKA Solomon Cutner, 1902-1988), piano, 1950s

1st mvt.

 

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2nd mvt.

 

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3rd mvt.

 

*****

Another take.

Artur Schnabel (1882-1951), piano, 1930s

 

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lagniappe

random sights

yesterday, Oak Park, Ill.

Saturday, May 28th

three takes

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), Piano Sonata No. 8 in A minor

Sviatoslav Richter (1915-1997), live

#1


#2


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Artur Schnabel (1882-1951), 1939

#1


#2


#3


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Dinu Lipatti (1917-1950), live, France (Besancon), 1950


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The A minor sonata is the first of only two Mozart piano sonatas in a minor key . . . It was written in one of the most tragic times of his life: his mother had just died.

Wikipedia

Thursday, 6/17/10

With the greatest artists, even the most familiar pieces sound as if you were hearing them for the first time.

Beethoven, Piano Sonata No. 14 in C# minor, Op. 27, No. 2 (“Moonlight”), 1801/Artur Schnabel, piano, 1933

1st & 2nd Movements

*****

3rd Movement

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lagniappe

The magnitude of his [Schnabel’s] creative accomplishments left technical considerations far behind. His Beethoven had incomparable style, intellectual strength, and phrasing of aristocratic purity. The important thing was that even when his fingers failed him, his mind never did. Schnabel was always able to make his playing interesting. A mind came through—a logical, stimulating, sensitive mind. And when Schnabel had his fingers under control, which was more often than not in his literature of Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert, he took his listeners to an exalted level. . . . There were no tricks, no excesses; just brain, heart and fingers working together with supreme knowledge.—Harold C. Schonberg, The Great Pianists (1963)

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Want more of Beethoven’s piano sonatas?

No. 21 (“Waldstein”)/Emil Gilels

No. 23 (“Appassionata”)/Solomon

No. 32 /Claudio Arrau

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art beat

At the risk of repeating myself, the Matisse exhibit at Chicago’s Art Institute closes Sunday (then opens next month at New York’s Museum of Modern Art). How many other opportunities will you have to see this stuff?

Henri Matisse:

Seek the strongest color effect possible . . . the content is of no importance.

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After a half-century of hard work and reflection the wall is still there.

Bathers with a Turtle (1908)


The Blue Window (1912)


Nude with a White Scarf (1909)

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