music clip of the day

jazz/blues/rock/classical/gospel/more

Tag: Arthur Russell

Friday, January 11th

more

Arthur Russell (1951-1992), singer, songwriter, cellist, producer

“You and Me Both” (A. Russell)

 

*****

“This Is How We Walk on the Moon” (A. Russell)

 

*****

“Springfield” (A. Russell)

 

**********

lagniappe

reading table

I’m saying this and it’s saying me

—Peter Gizzi (1959-), from “Archeophonics”

Friday, January 4th

like nobody else

Arthur Russell (1951-1992), singer, songwriter, cellist, producer; “That’s Us/Wild Combination” (A. Russell), with Jennifer Warnes (Calling Out of Context, 2004)

 

**********

lagniappe

random sights

other day, Oak Park, Ill.

Wednesday, November 12th

two takes

“A Little Lost” (A. Russell)

Sufjan Stevens (1975-), 2014


***

Arthur Russell (1951-1992)

 

**********

lagniappe

art beat

Helen Levitt (1913-2009), New York, 1940s

Helen Levitt 2

Saturday, October 5th

alone

Arthur Russell (1951-1992), “Soon-To-Be Innocent Fun,” 1985

Wednesday, 12/14/11

What I get from this guy I can’t quite put my finger on. But I do know this:
I don’t get it anywhere else.

 Arthur Russell (1951-1992), singer, songwriter, cellist

“You And Me Both”

*****

“This Is How We Walk on the Moon”

*****

“That’s Us/Wild Combination”

*****

Terrace of Unintelligibility, live studio performance, 1985

Part 1

***

Part 2

(First three clips originally posted 11/23/09.)

Saturday, 7/16/11

what’s new
(an occasional series)

James Blake, “The Wilhelm Scream,” Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, 7/14/11

Vodpod videos no longer available.

*****

 favorites
(an occasional series)
Hearing JB brought this MCOTD fave to mind (originally posted 11/23/09).

Here’s Arthur Russell, the “seminal avant-garde composer, singer-songwriter, cellist and disco producerwho died in 1992 at the age of 40 (of AIDS-related complications)  and is the subject of both a recent documentary, Wild Combination, and a new book, Hold On To Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973-1992

Arthur Russell

“Get Around To It”

*****

“You And Me Both”

*****

“This Is How We Walk on the Moon”

*****

“That’s Us/Wild Combination”

(Yeah, the fact that I’m posting four tracks by this guy shows how much his music, which I just encountered recently, has been getting under my skin.)

**********

[Russell’s] various distinctions—folkie, art-music songwriter and improviser, dance-club maven—seem incoherent until you hear several of his records. When musicians get angry about being categorized by critics, I usually feel frustrated: readers, after all, want to know what the record sounds like. With Russell, I take the musicians’ angle. Just listen to it and you’ll understand.

—Ben Ratliff, “The Many Faces, and Grooves, of Arthur Russell,” New York Times, 2/29/04

*****

For Arthur, there was no cachet to being eclectic. Rather, he played across genre because it would have required a colossal and entirely counterproductive effort on his part to stick to one sound. . . . Drifting into an ethereal, gravity-defying zone, Arthur had come to embody the interconnectivity of music.

—Tim Lawrence, Hold On To Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973-1992 (2009).

Sunday, 6/5/11

Some folks sing when they speak.

Bishop Robert Manley, Jr., Bethesda Temple Church of the Living God, Frankfort, Kentucky, 2008

Part 1

Vodpod videos no longer available.

***

Part 2

Vodpod videos no longer available.

**********

lagniappe

musical thoughts

I think there are certain aspects of music which do not have any equivalent in speech, in particular the pulse of music, the steady rhythm, and its synchronization with movement.

Oliver Sacks, M.D.

With all due respect to Dr. Sacks (whom I admire greatly), I think maybe he should get out more often—to, for instance, churches in Harlem.

*****

listening room: what’s playing

Professor Longhair, Crawfish Fiesta (Alligator); House Party New Orleans Style (Rounder); No Buts, No Maybes: The 1949-1957 Recordings (Hoodoo Records)

Arthur Russell, Calling Out Of Context (Audika)

Theo Parrish, Sound Sculptures Volume 1 (Sound Signature)

Eddie Jefferson at Ali’s Alley with Rashied Ali Quintet (Blue Music Group)

• Wadada Leo Smith’s Golden Quartet, Tabligh (Cuneiform)

• Henry Grimes & Rashied Ali, Going To The Ritual (Porter Records)

Paul Motian, Lost In A Dream (ECM) (with Chris Potter, Jason Moran); Rarum (ECM); Garden of Eden (ECM); Time and Time Again (ECM) (with Joe Lovano, Bill Frisell)

Jason Moran, Ten (Blue Note)

• Various Artists, Gospel Music (Hyena Records)

The Five Blind Boys of Mississippi: 1947-1954 (Acrobat)

Brother Claude Ely, Ain’t No Grave (Dust-to-Digital)

The Skatalites, Ball of Fire (Island)

Tinariwen: Imidiwan: Companions (World Village)

Ali Akbar Khan, Peerless (Navras)

Bach: Cello Suites, Nos. 1-3, Jean-Guinen Queyras (Harmonia Mundi)

Dmitri Shostakovich: String Quartet No. 15, Borodin Quartet (BMG Classics/Melodiya)

Music of Stefan Wolpe: Volume Six, David Holzman (Bridge Records)

Gyorgy Ligeti: String Quartets and Duets, Arditti String Quartet (Sony)

Morton Feldman: For Bunita Marcus, Stephane Ginsburgh (Sub Rosa); John TilburyMorton Feldman, All Piano (London HALL)

WKCR-FM (broadcasting from Columbia University)
Bird Flight (Phil Schaap, jazz [Charlie Parker])
Out to Lunch (Various, jazz)
Afternoon New Music (Various, classical and hard-to-peg)
Eastern Standard Time (Carter Van Pelt, Jamaican music)

WFMU-FM
Mudd Up! (DJ/Rupture, “new bass and beats”)
Sinner’s Crossroads
(Kevin Nutt, gospel)
—Give The Drummer Some
(Doug Schulkind, sui generis)
—Reggae Schoolhouse
(Jeff Sarge)
Transpacific Sound Paradise (Rob Weisberg, “popular and unpopular music from around the world”)
Daniel Blumin (sui generis)
—Primavera Sound Festival, Barcelona (live sets)

*****

mail

Richard:

Thanks and despite its brevity it is quite touching.

David [Holzman, in response to an email letting him know that he was featured here yesterday]

Saturday, 9/18/10

replay: a clip too good for just one day

Here’s Arthur Russell, the “seminal avant-garde composer, singer-songwriter, cellist, and disco producer” who died in 1992 at the age of 40 (of AIDS-related complications)  and is the subject of both a recent documentary, Wild Combination, and a new book, Hold On To Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973-1992.

Arthur Russell

“Get Around To It”

*****

“You And Me Both”

*****

“This Is How We Walk on the Moon”

*****

“That’s Us/Wild Combination”

(Yeah, the fact that I’m posting four tracks by this guy shows how much his music, which I just encountered recently, has been getting under my skin.)

(Originally posted on 11/23/09.)

**********

lagniappe

[Russell’s] various distinctions—folkie, art-music songwriter and improviser, dance-club maven—seem incoherent until you hear several of his records. When musicians get angry about being categorized by critics, I usually feel frustrated: readers, after all, want to know what the record sounds like. With Russell, I take the musicians’ angle. Just listen to it and you’ll understand.

—Ben Ratliff, “The Many Faces, and Grooves, of Arthur Russell,” New York Times, 2/29/04

*****

For Arthur, there was no cachet to being eclectic. Rather, he played across genre because it would have required a colossal and entirely counterproductive effort on his part to stick to one sound. . . . Drifting into an ethereal, gravity-defying zone, Arthur had come to embody the interconnectivity of music.

—Tim Lawrence, Hold On To Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973-1992 (2009)

Tuesday, 3/23/10

looking back

Today, celebrating our 200th post, we revisit a few favorites.

**********

9/14/09

If I didn’t have kids, would my ears be stuck, forever, on “repeat”?

Here’s something my younger son Luke, who just started college, played for me recently, after first pronouncing it, with quiet but absolute authority, the best thing this guy has done (already Luke’s learned that what’s important isn’t to be right; it’s to seem right).

Lupe Fiasco, “Hip Hop Saved My Life,” live, Los Angeles, 2008

*****

And here’s a track my older son Alex played for me a couple weeks ago, before heading back to school.

Dirty Projectors, “Stillness Is The Move”

*****

Koan for aging parents: What is the sound of a childless house?

**********

10/15/09

How to be both solid and fluid, both fat and delicate. How to make the beat breathe. These are things that, as a child, Philly Joe Jones began to learn while dancing—tap-dancing. Just watch the way Thelonious Monk, listening to this solo, rocks back and forth (1:25-1:50), as if he’s about to break into a little dance himself.

Philly Joe Jones, live (with Thelonious Monk), 1959

**********

lagniappe

He breathed our history as/his walking beat . . . The Man/So Hip/A City/Took/His/Name.—Amiri Baraka (formerly LeRoi Jones, in Eulogies [1996])

**********

10/30/09

The first time I stood before a judge at Chicago’s Criminal Courts Building at 26th and California—this was back in the ’70s (when I was working at Alligator Records)—it was to speak on behalf of this man, Hound Dog Taylor. The day before, during a drunken argument at his apartment, he’d shot his longtime guitarist Brewer Phillips (who survived). In his own way, Hound Dog was a pretty canny guy. When he told me about this incident over the phone, shortly after it happened, he put it this way: “Richard, they say I shot Phillip.”

(No, don’t touch that dial; these stills are way out of focus—which, for Hound Dog, seems just right.)

*****

Hound Dog Taylor and the Houserockers, live, Ann Arbor Blues Festival, 1973

“Wild About You Baby”

***

“Taylor’s Rock”

***

“I Held My Baby”

**********

11/23/09

Here’s Arthur Russell, the “seminal avant-garde composer, singer-songer-writer, cellist, and disco producer who died in 1992 at the age of 40 (of AIDS-related complications) and is the subject of both a recent documentary, Wild Combination, and a new book, Hold On To Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973-1992.

Arthur Russell

“Get Around To It”

*****

“You And Me Both”

*****

“This Is How We Walk on the Moon”

*****

“That’s Us/Wild Combination”

(Yeah, the fact that I’m posting four tracks by this guy shows how much his music, which I just encountered recently, has been getting under my skin.)

**********

12/5/09

Here one of the greatest American artists of the 20th century (composer Morton Feldman [1926-1980]) pays homage to another (painter Mark Rothko [1903-1970]).

Morton Feldman, “Rothko Chapel” (composed in 1971; first performed, at Houston’s Rothko Chapel, in 1972)

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

**********

12/6/09

I first heard this guy back in the mid-1970s, after reading a review in the New York Times, by the late Robert Palmer, of his first album, The Gospel Saxophone of Vernard Johnson—and I’ve been listening to him ever since.

Vernard Johnson, saxophone

Live, Texas (Roanoke)

**********

lagniappe

reading table

Music . . . helped me to go deeper inside myself, to find new things there: the variety which I had vainly sought in life and in travel, yet the longing for which was stirred in me by the surge of sound whose sunlit wavelets came to break at my feet.

—Marcel Proust, The Prisoner (Trans. Carol Clark)

Monday, 11/23/09

Here’s Arthur Russell, the “seminal avant-garde composer, singer-songwriter, cellist, and disco producer” who died in 1992 at the age of 40 (of AIDS-related complications)  and is the subject of both a recent documentary, Wild Combination, and a new book, Hold On To Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973-1992.

Arthur Russell

“Get Around To It”

*****

“You And Me Both”

*****

“This Is How We Walk on the Moon”

*****

“That’s Us/Wild Combination”

(Yeah, the fact that I’m posting four tracks by this guy shows how much his music, which I just encountered recently, has been getting under my skin.)

%d bloggers like this: