music clip of the day

jazz/blues/rock/classical/gospel/more

Thursday, October 30th

No background. No foreground. Three lines, intertwining.

Dewey Redman (1931-2006), tenor saxphone; Malachi Favors (1927-2004), bass; Ed Blackwell (1929-1992), drums; “Paris? Oui!,” 1969

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lagniappe

art beat

Bruce Davidson (1933-), Duffy Circus, Ireland, 1967

B016446

Wednesday, October 29th

basement jukebox

Solomon Burke (1940-2010), “Stupidity” (S. Burke), 1963


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lagniappe

art beat

Robert Frank (1924-)

robert_frank_11

*****

the beat goes on

Eighteen hundred posts—and counting.

Tuesday, October 28th

What she’s saying I don’t understand—and it doesn’t matter.

Moniek Darge and her music boxes, Belgium (Ghent), 2011

Monday, October 27th

Need a lift?

Konono No. 1, “Makembe”
Live (enhanced footage), France (Festival St. Nazaire), 2009

 

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lagniappe

art beat: yesterday at the Art Institute of Chicago

Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890)
Fishing in Spring, the Pont de Clichy (Asnières), 1887

83496_2028221

 

Sunday, October 26th

basement jukebox

The Capitalaires, “Holy Ghost” (c. 1964)

 

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lagniappe

reading table

This road—
no one goes down it,
autumn evening.

—Matsuo Basho (1644-1694; translated from Japanese by Robert Hass)

 

Saturday, October 25th

only rock ‘n’ roll

Murmurs, live, Oakland, Calif., 2014


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lagniappe

art beat

Lee Friedlander (1934-)

8art0627

Friday, October 24th

only rock ‘n’ roll

Vexx, live, San Diego, 2014

Thursday, October 23rd

never enough

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827), String Quartet No. 14 (Op. 131, C-sharp minor; 1826); Takács Quartet, live


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lagniappe

musical thoughts

Opus 131 . . . is routinely described as Beethoven’s greatest achievement, even as the greatest work ever written. Stravinsky called it ‘perfect, inevitable, inalterable.’ It is a cosmic stream of consciousness in seven sharply contrasted movements, its free-associating structure giving the impression, in the best performances, of a collective improvisation. At the same time, it is underpinned by a developmental logic that surpasses in obsessiveness anything that came before. The first four notes of the otherworldly fugue with which the piece begins undergo continual permutations, some obvious and some subtle to the point of being conspiratorial. Whereas the Fifth Symphony hammers at its four-note motto in ways that any child can perceive, Opus 131 requires a lifetime of contemplation. (Schubert asked to hear it a few days before he died.)

—Alex Ross, “Deus Ex Musica,” New Yorker, 10/20/14

*****

lagniappe

art beat: yesterday at the Art Institute of Chicago (lunch hour)

Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), The Poet’s Garden (1888)

1863_1595758

Wednesday, October 22nd

more sounds from Louisiana

Follow Me Down: Portraits of Louisiana Prison Musicians (trailer), 2012

 

*****

Music from the Big House (excerpt), 2010

 

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lagniappe

art beat

Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908-2004), Louisiana, 1947

cartier-bresson-web

Tuesday, October 21st

passings

John Holt, singer, songwriter, July 11, 1947-October 19, 2014

Paragons (John Holt, lead vocals), “The Tide Is High” (J. Holt), 1967

 

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